Dec 29 2010

TechKnow Year In Review 2010

It is that time of year where we reflect on the accomplishments of the passing year and look forward to the one to come. Here is a window into the past year in technology through this year’s popular posts on TechKnow Juixe.

Programming Rants

Products and Features

Tutorial and Resources

Patents and Trademarks

Code Conversations

Retweet 2010

Random Thoughts 2010

Year in Review


Oct 15 2010

Retweet September 2010

From time to time I just blast tweets about software development, project planning, team dynamics, or whatever else comes to mind. Here is a synopsis of recent tweets and rants. If you want to follow the conversation follow me at techknow and/or juixe and I’ll be sure to follow back.

Software Development

  • Email is not the future of UI. I dislike services that use email for data entry or input device.
  • Common source of errors, cut and paste!
  • Functional specifications are often times as misinterpreted as the Bible.
  • I’m a programmer by day, developer by night, and hacker in between.
  • Some features are disguised as bugs.
  • One man’s feature is another man’s bug.
  • Void is my favorite return type.
  • Code Commandment: No code shall PrintStackTrace
  • Show me your implementation and I’ll tell you about yourself.
  • The words “it does not compute” does not compute, they are not in my default dictionary.
  • Get your hack on!
  • When a developer says, “pretty much working” it does not mean production quality.
  • I’m not sure that a software application larger than “Hello, World” can be bug free.
  • If there is a giant red ‘Do Not Press’ or ‘Active Dooms Day Device’ button, someone will press it.
  • Every design decision should be a conscious choice, not an accidental assumption.
  • Will work for intellectual stimulation.
  • If you are a User Generated Content site saying you will censor a topic will only inspire your users to find ways around that.
  • What’s your default setting for the Ultimate Bitch Mode setting?

Team Dynamics

  • Just like how there are no any stupid questions, there are no any stupid ideas.
  • In order to get the most out of crowd sourcing you need to source your crowd.
  • Look past people’s past.
  • If you are going to shot for the stars you best have a rocket ship.
  • When the stars align, shoot for them. And if you shooting for the stars you best bring the big guns!
  • When shooting for the stars I bring an Klingon Bird of Prey!
  • And on the 8th day God said, “Let there be a TPS report.”
  • Life is too short to sell yourself short.
  • Don’t think in problems. Dream in solutions.
  • Never say maybe.
  • The next big thing usually starts as a small idea.
  • People will always push your buttons, you need to know how o deactivate those buttons.
  • I don’t fear being wrong. I fear not being able to recognize when other people are wrong.
  • You can’t delete emails once sent, but you can read them before you send them.
  • For every great idea there are hundreds of ways to mess it up.
  • Show me the monetization.

Product Placement

  • Mark Zuckerborg is a geek super evil privacy villain.
  • Boing Boing should just sell out to Rupert Murdoch.
  • Panda Express’ logo says, “Gourmet Chinese Food.” Really, Gourmet? Chinese?
  • American Apparel might file for bankruptcy, maybe China can buy it out and rename it to Chairman Mao Apparel.
  • The company Manpower has a very male chauvinist sounding name.
  • If only mother nature would have patented all her innovations, we would all be paying royalties to her.
  • Why does it cost $30 for Apple’s iPhone earphones? They like $.50 worth of material and $.25 of labor!
  • If you Google for love you will find about 1,930,000,000 results (0.23 seconds). At least one of those results is meant for you.
  • Google Finance should have a “I’m Feeling Lucky” button.
  • The cake is a lie. Do no evil is a lie.
  • The next version of the iPhone should be called ivePhone after it’s designer Jony Ive.
  • Upset that I’ve had to purchase yet another iPhone headset!!! At $30 a pop the white earphone are Apple’s razor blade business!

Resume Writing Tips

  • Resume Writing Tip: Use a good phone line for a phone interview.
  • Resume Writing Tip: At a minimum candidate should be able to figure out our URL by a) clicking the link on job description b) from my email.
  • Resume Writing Tip: The minimum research a candidate needs to do is lookup the company website himself prior to interviewing.
  • Resume Writing Tip: Ensure your cover letter or email is in one font, it shouldn’t look like you cut and pasted from somewhere else.
  • Resume Writing Tip: I would leave out MS Access 2000 out of technical skills. It’s also not necessary to list HTML, DHTML, and HTML5.
  • Resume Writing Tip: Proof read your resume and fix obvious typos, you can’t say you detailed oriented if you have basic spelling errors.

Quote

  • I want to put a ding in the universe. – Steve Jobs
  • The problem with Google is that Eric Schmidt is creepy. – Daring Fireball
  • They [People] want Google to tell them what they should be doing next. – Eric Schmidt
  • People aren’t ready for the technology revolution that’s going to happen to them. – Eric Schmidt

Oct 11 2010

The Resume is Dead

The resume as you know it is dead. Having a great resume and a perfect cover letter is not enough of a differentiator. Every candidate will have the same alphabet soup of buzzwords and they all list the same excellent communication and interpersonal soft skills in their resume. Any hiring manager will have the same experience of looking at inbox full of resumes that read the same. There is very little scientific method in the hiring process, it’s mostly voodoo. One way passionate candidates distance themselves from apathetic candidates is by learning a new programming language on their own, by contributing to open source projects, and by blogging and teaching what they’ve learned.

Recruiters are constantly looking for top candidates outside the traditional job boards, career fairs, job listings. There have been many instances where coders land job interviews because of their top rated technology blog, or their Stack Overflow reputation, or their side project in GitHub.

Recently, two stories made the front page of Hacker News that demonstrates that working running demonstrable code is better than sending out your static resume.

After Google released it’s Search Instant feature, Stanford student Feross Aboukhadijeh used the publicly available YouTube API to develop YouTube Instant. Feross was contacted by YouTube CEO Chad Hurley and offered a job via a tweet.

Designer Rodrigo Galindez gets hired by Zendesk after posting his thoughts and UI mockup to improve the new Twitter design.

As a candidate, you have to think outside the box, outside the resume. Every candidate will have a nice crisp resume. You can’t possibly distinguish yourself from other candidate by the format, font, or flow of your resume. Where appropriate be sure to highlight your contribution to open source projects, technical blog, of even the small natural language pet project written in scheme you might be tinkering with.


Aug 14 2010

Resume and Interview Tips

I’ve recently had an opportunity to interview for a job opening at my company. From my experience with the interview process, from both sides of the table, I have a few non-technical tips that might be helpful for someone looking for a new challenging position where they will leverage their skills and such and such years of experience in x, y, and z programming languages.

  • Proof read your resume and fix obvious typos, you can’t say you detailed oriented if you have basic spelling errors.
  • I would leave out MS Access 2000 out of technical skills. It’s also not necessary to list HTML, DHTML, and HTML5.
  • Ensure your cover letter or email is in one font, it shouldn’t look like you cut and pasted from somewhere else.
  • The minimum research a candidate needs to do is look up the company website himself prior to interviewing.
  • At a minimum candidate should be able to figure out our URL by a) clicking the link on job description b) from my email.
  • Use a good phone line for a phone interview.
  • Make sure the interviewer gets the feeling that you want to work there, not only that you have the skills to work there.  If you don’t got the skills show enthusiasm, their is always a job for the great candidate, even if they have to rewrite the job description.
  • Don’t name your resume anything but you name, and maybe the word resume  on it.  Don’t put a date geolocation or airport codes, etc.