Jun 14 2012

Breakdown of Proposed Generic Top Level Domains

ICANN, the organization that regulates domain names, has allowed organizations and individuals to apply for new generic Top Level Domains (gTLD). A Top Level Domain (TLD) is the a domain extension such as .com or .org used by millions of websites. In addition to .com and .org there are country specific TLDs such as .co.uk, .fr, and .mx. ICANN has nearly 2,000 applications for new gTLDs. ICANN has released to the public gTLD application information such as the newly proposed domain extension and the applying company. For example, Google has applied for nearly 100 domain extensions including for .app, .youtube, .goog, .plus, and many more. Google clearly can afford the $185,000/application fee.

I downloaded the data, played around with it and generated some graphs to help me visualize the new land rush for domains. Please note that I discounted and removed a few gTLD applications for non-latin domains.

The first chart shows that nearly 50% of the new domain extension originated from North America. North American and Europe combine make up over 80% while African organization only applied for roughly 1% of proposed new domain extensions.

The following chart shows that a large number of the new proposed generic domain extension are under five characters long but there are a few that are up to eighteen characters in length.

The following graph shows the most popular proposed domain extensions. For example, thirteen different individuals or organizations applied for the .app TLD, eleven for .inc and .home, ten for .art, etc. This chart shows only domains with five or more applications.

As previously noted, Google applied for nearly 100 domain extensions… 98 to be exact under Charleston Road Registry Inc. Top Level Domain Holding Limited registered 68 gTLDs followed by Amazon with 65. Apple doesn’t appear in this chart because this graph shows application organizations with more than ten domain extension applications.

I also wanted to graph the number of applications per primary contact and found out that a single individual, Daniel Schindler, has filed for three hundred domain extensions. Looking at the data, each of the applications submitted by Mr. Schindler are for distinct legal entities.

So who is the real domain squatter? ICANN will be squatting on nearly $400 million because of the $185k/application fee. Another question is, how will a flood of new gTLDs affect the value of current domains? And perhaps most importantly, how will the private organizations use and restrict access to these domain extensions?


Jun 7 2012

The Cost of Doing it Wrong

As the saying goes, if a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing well. It has been proven that doing a thing right the first time is most efficient and cost effective. But what is the cost of doing something wrong? In terms of money, I’ve seen cases where something is done incorrectly and then had to redone at a loss of $100k. In terms of time, you can model it in the following thought experiment.

If a task takes x amount of time to complete and it is done wrong the first time, how long does it take to fix it?  More than 4x. It takes to x amount of time to complete the task the first time, probably at least x amount of time to find out it was done wrong, another x amount to figure out what the first guy did, and finally x amount to fix it correctly.

We all can agree that time is money and if a task is done incorrectly it may cost at a minimum as much as four times as much as it would cost if done correctly the first time around.


May 28 2012

The 80 Percent

I always give 110% to any task I set out to complete. If you ever give anything less than 100% then you get the following logic…

It’s okay if we do 80%, but the 80% needs to be done 100%… We can’t deliver 80% of the 80% we actually attempt of the 100% we are committed too.


May 10 2012

Software as a Pegboard Set

Software is not like traditional engineering disciplines. Unlike a bridge whose requirements are essentially set in stone, software requirements consistently change and evolve with the needs of the business. The requirements, of say civil engineering, are more firm and concrete than that of software engineering because the artifacts that are being constructed are usually large physical objects like a road or bridge. In the other hand, software is malleable and it often refactored easier than business constraints, that is why product managers often prefer to wedge a round peg (software) into a square hole (requirements) as business constraints evolve. But unlike a kid’s shape sorter or pegboard set, the peg and the hole are consistently changing and not always into the same shape.

Shape Sorter Toy

Shape Sorter Toy


Apr 16 2012

Local Family Tech Support

It is hard to explain to family members that even though I “work with computers” as a software engineer I can’t always fix their computer problems. I tried to explain it to my grandma that I am more like a “race car driver than a mechanic when it comes to computers. I know how to use a computer but not how to fix the weird noise your computer makes.”. To which she responded, “oh that is fantastic, I can’t get this printer to work… It complains that I need a driver.”


Mar 28 2012

The Big Rewrite

When working with legacy code, there is a big difference between a developer trying to add or fix a feature and getting it to work and another developer trying and giving up only to recommend a complete rewrite. From my experience, the one main reason why any person suggest a complete rewrite of an existing application or feature that works for a large install base is only because they don’t understand it. I would be suspicious of any engineer or developer if he or she recommends to rewrite any large portion of a existing appellation just because because they don’t understand it.