Jul 30 2012

Social Networks for Developers and Designers

There is a growing number of social networks and websites that are targeting software developers and graphic designers. Some of these sites, most notably github, have been used as a recruiting tool and in the interview process in hiring developers.

github
Even though it is not strictly a social networking site, github has a lot of social and collaborate features that make it resemble one. But instead of posting your latest vacation pictures, you can post the programing source files for the open source projects you are working on. You can post any source code, from a single script file you find useful to a larger project.

coderwall
Coderwall allows developer and designers to post their skills and achievements and earn achievement badges. If someone forks your project on github, you get a badge. If you were a early github user, you get a different badge.

Coderwall Homepage

Coderwall Homepage

Forrst
Forrst feels like a Twitter or Tumblr for technologists. You can follow people, post images or ideas, and like and comment other people’s posts.

geekli.st
Similar to other social networks, on geekli.st you can follow other users, high five their accomplishments.

Geeklist Homepage

Geeklist Homepage


Dec 29 2010

Threadless

I recently received the Threadless: Ten Years of T-shirts from the World’s Most Inspiring Online Design Community book. I’ve never submitted a design or voted for a design on Threadless but I wear shirts and I’ve always been a fan of their products. The book was in my wishlist and someone in my family bought the book for me as a gift. The book is full of great designs which have been used on Threadless shirts over the past ten years. While reading about how Threadless started and the company culture one thread, pun intended, stood out. The community is the key to the success at Threadless. Threadless started out in a thread post in an online design forum where designers submitted designs for review and the best one was printed. As a business model, it seems very straight forward, but you can’t stress enough how important the community is to the company. As a classically trained software engineer, I approach everything from the aspect of technical specifications and software requirements so when I see a site like Threadless I think of the software features, like voting, commenting, etc. But reading this book I realized that Threadless is not a technology solution, but a living community. Fostering communities trumps technology. As engineers, we often quote and misunderstand the saying, “If you build it they will come” to mean technology focused website. At least, this was Google’s mistake with Google Wave, they built a great technology but no one came. I now believe that what the saying is referring to is not technology, but community.

Here are some other things I learned from the book. Threadless included free stickers with every order. Stickers have been used for years to spread word of mouth, and it pre-dates viral marketing. Stickers are a physical real world viral marketing vehicle. Everyone that has been to a developer conference has seen a conference speakers’ Mac Book Pro full of web 2.0 logos and stickers.

Networking is really important. For Threadless, this meant sharing office space with fellow designers and developers. Creating shared experiences builds community. Participating in events is fostering community. Provide the tools and means for the community to spread the company message and brand. Jeff Howe, who is credited with coining the term crowdsourcing, said the following in an essay in the book. “It takes a special company to understand that their ego – their creativity, their brilliance, their ideas- are welcome, but not necessary.  What’s necessary is the room in which the party takes place.”

Threadless

Threadless Designs

Here is my favorite quote from the book. “Jacob and I also began teaching a course at the Art Institute of Chicago.  That made us feel a little better about dropping out of school.”